Amegilla Atlas European Bees

Pierre Rasmont
Atlas of the European Bees: genus Amegilla

First on line 29.VIII.2014, updated 5.XI.2014, 19.II.2016

The genus Amegilla includes around 260 species all over the world. It includes 36 species in West-Palaearctic region.

Like other Anthophorini, Amegilla are all solitary species, most of them digging their simple nest in dry ground, giving their English name "digger bees". While some Anthophora and Habropoda could be sometimes seen in woody areas, Amegilla are clearly associated with arid or subarid biomes, matorrals, steppes, sub-deserts and deserts. Very few species cross the 45th parallell to the north and only in very isolated places.

Like Anthophora, they are foraging mainly flowers with long corollae, as Boraginaceae, Lamiaceae, Leguminosae, Scophulariaceae and Compositae from the Carduae tribe (thistles).

All species are very fast flyers. Some taxa are nearly impossible to catch because of their incredible agility. For these reasons, it is clear that their abundance and distribution remain underestimated. Beside, some species are not easy to identify. A lot of taxa are known just by few specimens.

Because of their relative scarcity in collection and their shape and colour homogeneity, their taxonomy remains quite confuse. Amegilla have been included in Anthophora during long time. As fundament, one should use the revision of Friese (1897) (under the name Podalirius) and Brooks (1988). This last one only dealing with a detailed generic and subgeneric classification. Several other papers could help: Priesner (1957) for Egypt and adjacent countries mainly N. Africa (under the name Anthophora), Iuga (1958) for Romania and adjacent countries, Osychnyuk (1978) for the European part of former USSR, Herrero & Pérez-Iñigo (1982) for Iberian peninsula. As for Anthophora, one cannot avoid to consult a bunch of small other papers to assume the identification of some species.

The genus Podalirius, as promoted by Friese (1897) was lumping alltogether Amegilla, Anthophora and Habropoda. I stick here instead with the generic and subgeneric classification of Brooks (1988) and Michener (2001, 2007). The West-Palaearctic tribe Anthophorini includes so the genera Amegilla, Anthophora and Habropoda (that Brooks placed in a separate tribe).

This first very provisional version only includes the full checklist of West-Palaearctic species and maps that just point out countries. For some species, it also display very preliminary detailed maps.
Because of the extreme difficulty to approach Amegilla, there are very few photographs of living specimens available.

Acknowledgements

This page is constructed in the framework of the STEP project - Status and Trends of European Pollinators - Coordinator: Simon Geoffrey Potts, University of Reading.
STEP Partners to Objective 1 (Document the status and trends of pollinators, map distributions): University of Mons (Prof. Pierre Rasmont; Denis Michez; Stephanie Iserbyt; Yvan Barbier); University of Reading (Stuart Roberts)

Many thanks to Manu Dehon for his help.

Pierre Rasmont

Citation:
Rasmont P. 2014. Atlas of the European Bees: genus Amegilla. 1st Edition. STEP Project, Atlas Hymenoptera, Mons, Gembloux. http://www.atlashymenoptera.net/page.aspx?ID=259

Other Anthophorini

Amegilla (present page)
Anthophora
Habropoda

Amegilla Atlas European Bees Friese, 1897

European bees
Amegilla albigena (LEPELETIER,1841)
Amegilla (Zebramegilla) albigena (Lepeletier, 1841)
photo  photo  photo  photo  photo  photo  photo
Amegilla andresi (FRIESE,1914)
Amegilla (Micramegilla) andresi (Friese, 1914)
Amegilla argophenax ENGEL,2007
Amegilla (Micramegilla) argophenax Engel, 2007
Amegilla byssina (KLUG,1845)
Amegilla (Micramegilla) byssina (Klug, 1845)
Amegilla camelorum (COCKERELL,1911)
Amegilla (incertae sedis) camelorum (Cockerell, 1911)
Amegilla cana (WALKER,1871)
Amegilla (Zonamegilla) cana (Walker, 1871)
Amegilla candidella (PRIESNER,1957)
Amegilla (incertae sedis) candidella (Priesner, 1957)
Amegilla canifrons (SMITH,1854)
Amegilla (Amegilla) canifrons (Smith, 1854)
Amegilla crocea (KLUG,1845)
Amegilla (Zebramegilla) crocea (Klug, 1845)
Amegilla deceptrix (PRIESNER,1957)
Amegilla (Micramegilla) deceptrix (Priesner, 1957)
Amegilla farinosa (KLUG,1845)
Amegilla (Amegilla) farinosa (Klug, 1845)
Amegilla fasciata (FABRICIUS,1775)
Amegilla (Micramegilla) fasciata (Fabricius, 1775)
photo  photo  photo  photo  photo
Amegilla garrula (ROSSI,1790)
Amegilla (Amegilla) garrula (Rossi, 1790)
photo  photo  photo  photo  photo
Amegilla glauca (ALFKEN,1926)
Amegilla (Micramegilla) glauca (Alfken, 1926)
Amegilla graeca ((ALFKEN),1942)
Amegilla (Zebramegilla) graeca (Alfken, 1942)
Amegilla harttigi (ALFKEN,1926)
Amegilla (Zebramegilla) harttigi (Alfken, 1926)
Amegilla incana (KLUG,1845)
Amegilla (Amegilla) incana (Klug, 1845)
Amegilla latizona (SPINOLA,1838)
Amegilla (Micramegilla) latizona (Spinola, 1838)
Amegilla lutulenta (KLUG,1845)
Amegilla (Zonamegilla) lutulenta (Klug, 1845)
Amegilla magnilabris (FEDTSCHENKO,1875)
Amegilla (Zebramegilla) magnilabris (Fedtschenko, 1875)

Since Brooks (1988) most authors made confusion between this species and the near Amegilla savignyi, that occurs in N. Africa only. Indeed, both species show the same conspicuously proeminent clypeus and labrum. These species are nevertheless well distinctive as pointed by Priesner (1957: 93) :
"A. savignyi Lep., [is] a species that is easily distinguished from magnilabris in having a full fascia on tergite V, slightly transverse labrum, intermixed black hairs at the clypeo-frontal suture, on the vertex and thorax, narrower abdominal fasciae and a small white hairspot exteriorly at the base of the metatarsus III. "
A. magnilabris is much more widespread than A. savignyi as it occurs in N. Africa too but also in most of southern Europe countries.

P. Rasmont
photo  photo  photo  photo  photo  photo  photo  photo  photo  photo  photo  photo  photo  photo  photo  photo  photo
Amegilla marqueti ((PÉREZ),1895)
Amegilla (incertae sedis) marqueti (Pérez, 1895)
Amegilla montivaga (FEDTSCHENKO,1875)
Amegilla (Micramegilla) montivaga (Fedtschenko, 1875)
photo
Amegilla mucorea (KLUG,1845)
Amegilla (Micramegilla) mucorea (Klug, 1845)
Amegilla nigricornis ((MORAWITZ),1873)
Amegilla (Micramegilla) nigricornis (Morawitz, 1873)
Amegilla nigropilosa (FRIESE,1896)
Amegilla nigropilosa (Friese, 1896)
Amegilla niveocincta ((SMITH),1854)
Amegilla (Zonamegilla) niveocincta (Smith, 1854)
Amegilla nubica ((LEPELETIER),1841)
Amegilla (Aframegilla) nubia (Lepeletier, 1841)
Amegilla ochroleuca (PÉREZ,1879)
Amegilla (Amegilla) ochroleuca (Pérez, 1879)
photo  photo  photo  photo
Amegilla omissa (PRIESNER,1957)
Amegilla (Zebramegilla) omissa (Priesner, 1957)
Amegilla pulverea (WALKER,1871)
Amegilla (Zonamegilla) pulverea (Walker, 1871)
Amegilla punctifrons (WALKER,1871)
Amegilla (Zebramegilla) punctifrons (Walker, 1871)
Amegilla quadrifasciata (DE VILLERS,1789)
Amegilla (Amegilla) quadrifasciata (de Villers, 1789)
photo  photo  photo  photo  photo
Amegilla salviae (MORAWITZ,1876)
Amegilla (Zebramegilla) salviae (Morawitz, 1876)
Amegilla savignyi (LEPELETIER,1841)
Amegilla (Zebramegilla) savignyi (Lepeletier, 1841)

Since Brooks (1988) most authors made confusion between this species (found in N. Africa only) and the near Amegilla magnilabris (that also occurs in Europe). Both species show the same conspicuously proeminent clypeus and labrum. Priesner (1957: 93) provided good diagnpstic characters: "A. savignyi Lep., [is] a species that is easily distinguished from magnilabris in having a full fascia on tergite V, slightly transverse labrum, intermixed black hairs at the clypeo-frontal suture, on the vertex and thorax, narrower abdominal fasciae and a small white hairspot exteriorly at the base of the metatarsus III. "

P. Rasmont
Amegilla velocissima (FEDTSCHENKO,1875)
Amegilla (Micramegilla) velocissima (Fedtschenko, 1875)

References

Alfken J.D. 1927. Ueber einige Arten der Anthophora quadrifasciata-Gruppe (Hym.). Ent. Mitt. 16: 120-122.
Brooks R. W. 1988. Systematics and phylogeny of the Anthophorine bees (Hymenoptera Anthophoridae ; Anthophorini). The university of Kansas Bulletin, 53(9) : 436-575.
Friese H. 1897. Die Bienen Europa's (Apidae europaeae). Theil III. Solitäre Apiden. Genus Podalirius. Berlin, 316 p.
Herrero J. & Pérez-iñigo Mora. 1982. Las abejas de España: El género Anthophora (Hym. Apoidea). Catedra de Entomologia. Facultad de Biologia. Universidad Complutense, Madrid, 31 p.
Iuga V.G. 1958. Fauna Republicii Populare Romîne. Hymenoptera Apoidea Fam. Apidae Subfam. Anthophorinae. Academia Republicii Populare Romîne, Bucuresti, 270 pp.
Michener C.D. 2007. The Bees of the World. Second edition. The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, 953 p.
Osychnyuk A.Z. 1978. Clef de détermination des insectes de la partie européenne d'URSS, Tome III. Hyménoptères. Première partie. Traduction partielle: Superfamille Apoidea (apoïdes). Anthophoridae. Mémoire de fin d'études, Université de Mons-Hainaut, Ecole d'Interprètes Internationaux, 100 pp.
Osytchnjuk A.Z. 1978. Opredelitel' nasekomykh evropejskoj chast SSSR. Tom III. Pereponchatokrylye pervaya chast. Apoidea Andrenidae (ed. K.B. Gorodkov). Akademia Nauk SSSR, Leningrad, pp. 315- [in Russian].
Priesner H. 1957. A review of the Anthophora-species of Egypt (Hymenoptera: Apidae). Bull. Soc. entom. Egypte, 41: 1-115.